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Episode 212

11 Comments

Performance Menu: Journal of Health & Athletic Excellence

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Download a transcript of this episode here

 

Topics:

  1. [4:58] Kill Cliff Recovery Drink
  2. [11:30] BCAA Ratio
  3. [14:26] Making Up Calories On Weekends
  4. [18:15] Oleic Acid And Seborrheic Dermatitis
  5. [22:34] Valsalva Maneuver
  6. [18:20] Atrial Fibrillation
  7. [32:18] Acupuncture
  8. [38:42] Chiropractic
  9. [48:47] Strengthening Joints And Connective Tissue

 

 

Questions:

1. KillCliff- THE Recovery Drink

Steven says:
First, just want to get all the mushy stuff out of the way, so thank you both for all the wonderful knowledge you drop on us on a weekly basis.  I adopted the Paleo lifestyle about 2 years ago and haven’t looked back since… Well sort of, I am stationed in Italy, and evidently they like their pizza and pasta..  But I have a question about this “new drink” that I have seen around the internet and at my old CrossFit box called KillCliff. It was developed by a former Navy SEAL that includes all natural ingredients like Ginger Root, Green Tea Extract, Milk Thistle, Ginseng Root Powder and an enzyme mix of Amylase, Beta Gluconase, Bromelain, Invertase, Lipase, Protease 4.5, and Serrapeptase as well as B, C and E Vitamins.  BUT, it is only a propietary blend and they dont disclose the exact amount of each ingredient.  So my question is,( besides the flavor being called Double Awesomeness) do you see any benefit to this drink to supplement for recovery/ and anti-inflammatory?  The link is attached below.

http://www.killcliff.com/default.asp

 

2. BCAA ration

Michael says:
What is the best ratio of leucine, isoleucine, and valine?  For example 8:1:1, 3:2:1 etc.

Thanks

 

3. Gorging on 1-2 days to eat less during the week

Jason Blanchard says:
Hey Robb and Greg, thanks for all the hilarious podcasts you two have made, I laugh out loud while walking and look crazy because of you quite often. My question is pretty straightforward…I am a very active individual looking to slowly increase my workload even more over the coming month. Right now im trying to fuel myself with enough good quality calories everyday, eating as close to 4000 calories as I can. I try to stick to 3 meals, as you can imagine, this is quite difficult to do in just 3 meals, but my problem is that my acrobatics are in the evening and I finish late and by the time im home if I would eat I would end up finishing right before bed, and if I eat at all at night it screws up my sleep so I try to keep my meals to earlier in the day. The main problem with that is that eating so much in one meal is bloody EXHAUSTING! I am only 143 pounds at 5″11. A twig, and my digestive system is not too strong as is. I know the ideal thing would be to lessen my workload, but the simple fact is that this is something I love to do, and its what I wish to make my career in as well. With such a high training load, and tons of movement daily, 3 big meals slow me down…so my question is do you think it would be alright to eat less during the week, not a huge amount less but lets say 2500 calories…and then on weekends when I am not doing classes in the evening I would eat very large amounts such as 6-7 thousand calories. On these days I could just do very very light movement, but pretty much stay in rest mode mostly. In my mind I would be storing the excess energy as fat, and then utilizing it during the week due to less calorie consumption. Reasonable? obv. this is all individual, but im curious to see your opinion on it. Thanks in advance and sorry for how long this is!

 

4. Oleic acid and seborrhic dermatits

Justin Lascek (of 70’s Big) says:
Hey Robb and Greg,

I’ve noticed various questions on your show about people getting skin rashes after shifting to a Paleo diet. I even remember having rash issues when I transitioned to a Paleo approach in 2008. A woman I know has had some persisting dandruff. She sleeps well, trains regularly, takes Vitamin D, magnesium, and fish oil, and adheres to a Paleo eating approach. After trying various shampoos and conditioners, her dandruff conditions persist.

I started doing some research on seborrhic dermatits, and one of the causes is fungal related, specifically a type of yeast called Malassezia. Long story short, Malassezia uses oleic acid as a metabolite; it allegedly consumes the saturated fats and leaves the unsaturated fats to irritate the stratum corneum, the top layer of skin. This “barrier breach” on the skin induces an irritation response: dandruff and dermatitis.

My chemistry is not stellar and I haven’t heavily researched this topic, but is there any merit to the idea that fish oil — or perhaps an over abundance of it — may supply this fungus with metabolites that could lead to this skin irritation? I’m not suggesting the fish oil is bad, but merely causing a weird reaction when this fungus is actually present (at the time of this writing I don’t know how the fungus gets there to begin with).

In any case, I’ve heard Robb chalk up skin issues to most likely missing out on a vitamin or mineral in the diet. Is there any merit to something like the increased amount of dietary fatty acids causing or exacerbating skin problems?

Thanks fellas,

–Justin Lascek

 

5. Valsalva Manuever

Susan says:
New to weightlifting and need some help.  I am 60 year old female totally a mess until I hired a trainer who introduced me to fitness and Paleo in January.  I love it all, well maybe not the burpees, but need some advice about breathing.  My trainer recommended using the Valsalva Manuever to help with my lifts.  I am trying to learn this but I went to Dr. Google and saw many bad reviews of this. I am dead lifting 135 and pressing 47 so I am progressing slowly but increasing each time I work out.  My back squat is not working well. Shoulder mobility is lacking but working on this.  One day I will do a real pull up!

I have lost 65 lbs and feel better than I have in 30 years. I have about 40 lbs to go. Yes, I did not throw the scale away.  Off the Celebrex and no more pain except soreness.

I would appreciate any help with this. I listen to the podcast at work and love it.  Know you need a life but I would love more podcasts…Thanks for all you do.  You have helped to change a life!

 

6. A paleo solution for paroxysmal, lone atrial fibrillation?

Mark Fromberg says:
One health issue you have all been silent on is the “other” heart disease epidemic: Atrial fibrillation. What good science is there on how to prevent it?

I am a long term endurance athlete, now in my 50s, with no history of heart disease. I have never been a smoker or overweight. In the last 6 years have had increasingly frequent but intermittent bouts of symptomatic “lone” atrial fibrillation, likely vagally mediated, most often lasting many hours, usually beginning when I sleep. So far, despite a myriad of well-intended suggestions, from dietary taurine, magnesium supplements, hawthorne tea, and less exercise, to a myriad of nasty prescription drugs, nothing has slowed the increasing frequency of this condition. I can no longer reliably train for the triathlons I used to compete in regularly.

This is a more common and more debilitating condition than most people realize, and it is the number one cause of stroke. So, what can your medical investigative skills do to help me and the thousands of others who are also afflicted with this?

 

7. Acupuncture?

G. says:
Hi there, I spend a fair bit of time reading medical literature and trying my best to figure out the best ways to proceed with my own health issue (autoimmune hypothyroidism). I have honestly had the best results with pure evidence based (rather than experiential based) medicine. Notice that I did not use the term western medicine as that term is in itself rather racist considering that this form of healthcare has had contributors from pretty much any nationality one could mention. Also as this composite form of healthcare progress’s it certainly does treat the patient as a whole, the big problem being crappy doctors rather than a crappy central concept.

My question is about the efficacy of acupuncture. To my knowledge there has never been a conclusive trial showing acupuncture to be any more effective than a good massage or for efficacy in treating serious ailments. In addition I have read time and time again that there are no correlate physiological structures to be found at acupressure points.

 

8. Chiropractic – why does the Paleo world seem to embrace it?

Matt Kennedy says:
Hi Robb,
I get why so many chiros are pro Paleo (they’re anti pills and pro movement etc.) but why does much of the Paleo world – which embraces the scientific method and stands up against pseudo science so fiercely – drink the chiropractic Kool Aid so willingly?

I mean, subluxation to cure cancer?? Or neck manipulation of kids and babies?? Fuck me. I know not all chiros go all the way down the rabbit hole but still, if chiropractic isn’t the Scientology of the medical world then what is?

Plus calling themselves ‘Doctors’ when they’re simply not (sure there are a handful who are also MDs) is just bare-faced fibbery.

The Paleo world stands up against mega-NGOs (like ‘The Heart Foundation’ and ‘The Cancer Council’ here in Oz) who tow the old lines for fear of public backlash – even at the risk of out health) so where’s the backlash against the damaging and myth-riddled Chirotology?

Yours,
Matt in Melbourne

 

9. Develop more robust joints & connective tissue

Joss says:
Robb & Greg,

I’m a 42-year old male; I’ve been lifting for slightly over 2 years, mostly doing 3 sets of 5 on the key lifts.  My strength has increased a lot, but I find I still get injured a couple times a year.  Specifically, I’ve injured my shoulder doing some indoor climbing (I think I overextended myself), doing wall-balls, or even lowering a heavy push-press rep.  Also, my elbow flares up each time I do chin-ups (never kipped).  How should I go about bulletproofing my joints?  Should I add some high reps / low weight on the classic lifts?  Or add some different movements (e.g., shoulder rotations)? Any other ideas? Last, should I just learn to live with it (and prepare myself for even worse as I get older)?

Thank you.

 

 

 

 

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  1. Dave Sill
    January 7, 2014 at 1:47 pm

    Gotta say I wasn’t impressed with your handling of the chiropractic question.

    I have no problem of doctors of chiropractic calling themselves doctors. As you pointed out, they have a doctorate degree from *some* institution. Of course, PhDs in the fine arts can call themselves doctors, too.

    My problem is when they pass themselves off as equivalent to MDs…wearing lab coats and using terms like “patient”, “diagnose”, and “treatment”. Chiropractic simply isn’t supported by science and isn’t the equal of modern medicine.

    It doesn’t reflect well on the paleo community when it accepts chiropractic as anything but a therapy that *might* help people with back/neck issues. The chiropractic principle that *all* disease comes from spinal joint dysfunction is pure quackery. How is that even compatible with the philosophy that many diseases are diet-induced? If a DC can fix my obesity/diabetes/systemic inflamation/etc, why should bother with a paleo diet?

  2. DJ
    January 8, 2014 at 5:36 am

    Thanks for standing up for Chiropractors! I go to one and he’s helped me immensely.

  3. Jeannine
    January 8, 2014 at 9:40 am

    I use to think Chiropractors were witch doctors until I went and saw one out of desperation to relieve some upper back and neck pain that I was having. I was in so much pain when I went and saw this Chiropractor that I actually cried during my initial visit. He adjusted me around 11 am and by 6 pm that same day my pain was completely gone. I go once every three weeks now and haven’t had any pain since. He also prescribed me massage therapy which worked wonders for my knotted up muscles. He also advocates a holistic approach and a paleo lifestyle which is a plus. If I would have gone to a doctor he/she would have just prescribed me pain pills, I’m sure. Fin.

  4. Starpaws
    January 8, 2014 at 2:09 pm

    Just a comment on Chiropractic; Good lord man, relax. I know many “body workers” who are so gifted as to almost defy credulity. My chiropractor is one such set of magic hands, insightful practitioner. His degree is DC, but his work is something I’m sure there’s no degree in yet is the most efficacious work I and the MDs who recommend him have ever seen.

  5. Mike B
    January 8, 2014 at 3:19 pm

    Guys,

    I must say this was a refreshing episode.
    We need to spin you too up more often, good fun.

    Thanks for all the hard work that you guys do standing in the eye of the storm and being a voice of sanity.

    Sincerely,
    Mike

  6. Michael Acanfora,DC
    January 8, 2014 at 8:59 pm

    Robb and Greg,
    Holy fucking, fuckerson!!! The usage of the fornication word reached a crescendo especially with the chiropractic question.

    I wanted to thank you for your support of chiropractic, but I was too busy curing cancer, cutting the heads off of chickens and turning brass into gold—just an normal day in the life of a chiropractor.

    BTW, even my staunchest to far-left colleagues are saying they cure cancer. As far as the witch-doctery, I guess all those NFL teams, along with, major D1 football program,NBA, MLB, NHL and those silly Olympic athletes have drank the chiro Kool-Aide!!!

    Lastly, what we ask with regards to evidenced-based medicine—what do you accept as evidence? Almost 120 years of 100K+ of case studies, we got it. If your looking for RCT ( Robb as a researcher you know the cost of even a small RCT), sorry we do not have the funding that the big universities have. When we do get the occasion funding we usually blow the doors off with studies that show chiropractic lowers blood pressure,fertility issues and otitis media in infants.

    Thanks boys–I gotta go bend the space-time continuum. Later.

  7. fmsauthor
    January 8, 2014 at 10:35 pm

    I had terrible nerve pain in my back for 35 years. Yes, you read that correctly. I received so many tests and treatments from the conventional MD community I can’t even count them all. In addition, I suffered excruciatingly painful episodes regularly for years. It wasn’t until I saw a chiropractor who adjusts me any time I begin to feel uncomfortable and one of his physical therapists who gave me an exercise routine to do nightly that I got any relief. I haven’t needed morphine in 3 months, the longest I’ve ever gone without an episode in 35 years. Now I’ve become paleo and see a naturopath to try to combat the world’s worst IBS and insomnia (I have fibromyalgia). All was going well until I began Adrenal balance capsules to regulate my cortisol level. Then the diarrhea returned. Anyone have any suggestions? All I eat is chicken, turkey, fish and cooked veggies. I cannot eat a salad or red meat. My life is hell as a result – no social events that involve food. Try living like that for 2 yrs.!

  8. Michael Acanfora,DC
    January 9, 2014 at 11:55 pm

    that should be DON’T cure cancer.

  9. Rebbecca Hoffman, CMT
    January 10, 2014 at 4:14 pm

    Great handling of the Chiropractor question.

    Adding on about Chiropractors… Because of the issues Greg himself pointed out, it is becoming more common for chiro’s who do not perform soft tissue work to have a massage therapist or other similar bodyworker in house. I would not go to one that does not employ one or performs soft tissue work themselves.

    As for those who question about the philosophy of Chiropractics and passing themselves off as MD’s, in many cases a DC will have more relevant training in nutrition and physiology than an MD would. In addition, many dysfunctions of the body can be directly linked to lack of proper circulation in the veins and lymph and impingement’s upon the nerves, arteries, and soft tissue. To be an MD these days requires very little thinking, for whenever a diagnosis is inputted into the system, the output is the treatments that give the best billing rate. Had the system never changed, we would not differentiate between a DC, DO, or an MD today.

  10. Michael Acanfora,DC
    January 11, 2014 at 5:51 am

    Robb and Greg,
    Holy fucking, fuckerson!!! The usage of the fornication word reached a crescendo especially with the chiropractic question.

    I wanted to thank you for your support of chiropractic, but I was too busy curing cancer, cutting the heads off of chickens and turning brass into gold—just an normal day in the life of a chiropractor.

    BTW, even my staunchest to far-left colleagues are saying they DON’T cure cancer. As far as the witch-doctery, I guess all those NFL teams, along with, major D1 football program,NBA, MLB, NHL and those silly Olympic athletes have drank the chiro Kool-Aide!!!

    Lastly, what we ask with regards to evidenced-based medicine—what do you accept as evidence? Almost 120 years of 100K+ of case studies, we got it. If your looking for RCT ( Robb as a researcher you know the cost of even a small RCT), sorry we do not have the funding that the big universities have. When we do get the occasion funding we usually blow the doors off with studies that show chiropractic lowers blood pressure,fertility issues and otitis media in infants.

    Thanks boys–I gotta go bend the space-time continuum. Later.

  11. NIck
    February 5, 2014 at 10:15 am

    Greg,
    Who is your chiro in the Sunnyvale area? I’m looking for one and yours sounds awesome!
    Nick

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