The Paleo Coach

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Hey folks!

 

I wanted to let y’all know about an outstanding book by my good friend Jason Seib, The Paleo Coach.  I’m on page 187 of this 250 page book and just wanted to get this outstanding book on folks radar. Apologies for not waiting until I finished the whole thing but as I’ll mention below I’m going to be off the grid for a few weeks working on a project.

About Jason Seib

I met Jason many years ago when he contacted my wife, Nicki Violetti, for a business consult. Jason recently opened a gym and had some questions about branding, business systems and a number of related topics. It was clear that Jason was not running the typical CrossFit train wreck of a gym. He had some great systems in place already and was actually waffling as to the utility of maintaining the CF affiliation. In an act of both bravery and a desire to focus on quality, Jason went his own way and rebranded as Clackamas Physical Conditioning.

It was not long after this that Jason linked wagons with Sarah Fragoso and that crew has subsequently provided some of the best training and nutrition coaching available.

Jason is a phenomenal coach…he knows the S&C game inside and out and I can un-reservedly recommend him as a nutrition coach. He KNOWS the science and the practical application of this stuff.

About the Paleo Coach

Imagine the following scenario: Smart dude commits his life to coaching and nutrition. Builds a successful gym and online coaching practice, works with thousands of people…continues to learn and perhaps most importantly, gets phenomenal results with his clients.

Then he takes this experience and writes a book. You might go out on a limb and suspect this would be a good effort and in the case of The Paleo Coach, you would be correct. Meal plans, exercise, life-coaching, personal anecdotes, all woven together in a precise but easy to grasp style. I actually see this book as being birthed in a similar way as my own, in that it was an outgrowth of many hours working with people, figuring out the big picture but also the little nuances that help to make a program customizable. In short, I cannot recommend this book enough.

Off The Grid

Apologies for not going into greater detail with the book, but we will have Jason on an upcoming episode of the podcast where we will get into much more detail about not only the book but how he tackles coaching and the many other projects Jason has cooking. The brevity is forced on me as I have a very time sensitive project cooking that will require me to be 100% off the grid for about 2 weeks. I know myself and the crack-cocaine of tinkering with the blog, answering emails and tinkering with social media will bite me in the fanny, so y’all will not hear a peep from me until about May 1. If the interwebz burn down in that time, it’s been good, let’s go farm some coconuts.

Everybody Needs a Coach- Kelly Starrett

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  1. Lindsey Mathews
    April 17, 2013 at 1:26 pm

    Just got the book. Awesome. Love your description “train wreck of a gym” because it is so true. There are far too many average as F*** gyms out there. My boyfriend Logan (Original Nutritionals) and I are opening Deuce Gym in Venice, CA as I write this. We’ve started from the bottom with the Fake Gym outside, researched for at least two years, and now we are charging full force. Thank you for your awesome podcasts, being a role model to us, and even answering us on FB when we had questions. You the man. Welcome at our gym any time.

  2. Jess
    April 21, 2013 at 4:06 am

    Just bought this book also and really getting into it. Will be interested in listening into the podcast.

  3. Jeremy S
    May 3, 2013 at 4:29 pm

    Robb,

    My wife has tucked your book away somewhere…I recall seeing some references to some numbers to shoot for for with regards to cholesterol levels.

    I just got the results from an NMR profile I requested after my Dr. freaked over my 270 TC…I can see generally that I’m in pretty good shape, but welcome you pointing out any outliers that jump out at you…

    NMR Lipoprofile
    CVD Risk:
    HDL-P = 34.7
    Small LDL-P = 157
    LDL Size = 21.5

    Insulin Resistance/Diabetes Risk
    Large VLDL-P = <0.7
    Small LDL-P = 157
    Large HDL-P = 11.6
    VLDL Size = Too small to measure
    LDL Size = 21.5
    HDL Size = 9.9
    Insulin Resistance Score = 4, (0-100)

    NMR Lipoprotein Test
    LDL-P = 1589

    Lipids
    LDL-C (Calculated) = 160
    HDL-C = 81
    Triglyceride = 25
    Total Cholesterol = 246

    Thanks, Jeremy

    (reply)

  4. Jeremy S
    May 3, 2013 at 4:31 pm

    The above is after a year of fairly diligent grass fed, and pastured meats/eggs…business travel not withstanding…

  5. Manuel Herrera
    May 9, 2013 at 6:35 pm

    Jason Seib stopped by the Whole Foods here in Portland, OR last Saturday (05/04) to give a free talk and a free Paleo lunch! It was good finally meeting and hearing someone from the Paleo community. I decided to switch my diet and lifestyle to Paleo and have obtained truly awesome results. I lost over 40 pounds in five months! My weight just dropped precipitously. I’m 5’9 and weighted 188 Ibs. in early December. Now I weigh 143 and I feel great. Along with the change in diet, I started to increase my mileage in running. Since January, I have developed a strong interest in running as a hobby and sport. I also lift weights about three times a week, but since going Paleo months ago, I have not been as active in resistance training as I used to. I’m a bit worried that I might be doing too much running that I lost, not just fat, but also muscle. I know that Jason and others are not too keen on running long distances (I have been running up to 8 miles so far and want to increase up to 13 miles). Jason did a great job writing about the healthiest way to train; specifically, he advised to avoid traditional cardio like running. But I still want to be able to run as long as I can without compromising my health. What would be an acceptable compromise? What mileage range can still be considered “healthy” and Paleo? I’ve been going by what Dr. Cordain mentioned in one of his books that our male ancestors walked and jogged 10-15 miles to hunt. So, I thought I can somehow mimic that distance and activity level. Wondering if you can give me some insight into this. Thanks so much!

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